I took my time in checking out a few different alternatives to Scratch, I found three that I felt would be relevant and quite easy to use within the classroom.
Below is the Draft Australian Curriculum descriptors to which I have connected these activities/alternative programmes to.
Draft Australian Curriculum: Technology (ACARA,
2013).


Content descriptors:


2.4 – Identify, explore and use digital systems (hardware and software
components) for personal and classroom needs
 2.5 – Follow, describe, represent and play with a sequence of steps and
decisions needed to solve simple problems
 4.5 – Define simple problems, and follow and describe the algorithms
(sequence of steps and decisions) needed to solve them
 4.6 – Design and implement simple visual programs with user input and
branching
 6.6 – Follow, modify and describe simple algorithms involving sequence of
steps, decisions, and repetitions that are represented diagrammatically and in
plain English
 6.7 – Design and implement digital solutions using visual programs with user
input, branching and iteration


PLUG AND PLAY MAPS
http://www.plugandplaymaps.com/
This program can be used in a variety of ways to match your needs. It is fun and the students will love the different elements on this site.

MONKEY JAM
http://monkeyjam.org/
Monkey Jam is a digital pencil test and stop motion animation program. It is
designed to let you capture images from a webcam, camcorder, or scanner and
assemble them as separate frames of an animation. Age Appropriate and fun to use.

GAME SALAD
http://gamesalad.com/
This fantastic site allows for students to create their own game and understand how exactly apps and computer games are established and made. A great chance to be creative.

The draft form of the Australian Curriculum Technologies allows
students to be able to use their education in technologies to move from creative
play through to being able to develop new innovations.  The huge variety of programs are available online, will also support the Curriculum’s goals to cater for different student abilities and learning capabilities (ACARA,
2012).
 
 
In Phase two we are to extend our knowledge of Scratch and computer programming by engaging in self-directed exploration of programming with Scratch. I chose to build another race car game and make the track itself a complete track instead of just point A to point B.

Draft Australian Curriculum: Technology (ACARA, 2013). 

2.4 – Identify, explore and use digital systems (hardware and software
components) for personal and classroom needs
 2.5 – Follow, describe, represent and play with a sequence of steps and
decisions needed to solve simple problems
 4.5 – Define simple problems, and follow and describe the algorithms
(sequence of steps and decisions) needed to solve them
 6.6 – Follow, modify and describe simple algorithms involving sequence of
steps, decisions, and repetitions that are represented diagrammatically and in
plain English
 6.7 – Design and implement digital solutions using visual programs with user
input, branching and iteration.

Learning Potentials

I found within this activity of the extension of the race car, it is a very structured way to establish new ideas through scaffolding.  With this activity I feel as though it will be suitable for those students who finish  first or better yet, they find the first activity of phase one basic and have the desire to move onto a more advance level.
 
 
Phase 1 included the challenge to create a car game.   Firstly, I had to change the background colour to green, then draw a grey road and then draw a red horizontal line at the end of the road.  I developed the sequence which would have the car begin at the starting position and stopping at the red finish line using the control elements such as the arrows keys to direct the car in the correct direction.  Scratch can be used in the classroom in this way to customise and differentiate activities. Students can work at their own pace and complete projects they way they want to and still meet the
objective of the activity. Students will use their problem solving skills along
with creative and critical thinking with creating or extending a Scratch
program/game.
Draft Australian Curriculum: Technology (ACARA, 2013).
The activities from phase one, align with the following  descriptors:

 2.4 – Identify, explore and use digital systems (hardware and software
components) for personal and classroom need.
2.5 – Follow, describe, represent and play with a sequence of steps and
decisions needed to solve simple problems
4.5 – Define simple problems, and follow and describe the algorithms
(sequence of steps and decisions) needed to solve them
4.6 – Design and implement simple visual programs with user input and
branching
6.6 – Follow, modify and describe simple algorithms involving sequence of
steps, decisions, and repetitions that are represented diagrammatically and in
plain English
 6.7 – Design and implement digital solutions using visual programs with user
input, branching and iteration

PING PONG GAME

Next activity I had to create a Ping Pong game by creating a paddle and a ball. I then followed directions to develop a program sequence for the game. I found this one very difficult as my computer kept freezing on me.  This is not ideal while using Scratch :(
 
 
My journey began with phase one -  Introduction to scratch programming of the assigned Scratch activities, I had to start by installing Scratch onto my computer as I have never used this program before and found it in the beginning to be very challenging and difficult to understand how the controls were to work. I was quick to begin experimenting with Scratch by following the directions outlined by the course lecturer in the course activities. When
beginning the journey with the program ‘Scratch’ it became apparent that it
clearly takes all of the essential programming constructs like sequencing,
conditional branching, control structures, data manipulations etc, and wraps
them in a very friendly, very easy to use environment that even the youngest
students can use with just a little knowledge.